publication

Dual-head gamma camera system for intraoperative localization of radioactive seeds

Arsenali, B., De Jong, H. W A M, Viergever, M. A., Dickerscheid, D. B M, Beijst, C., Gilhuijs, K. G A

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/60/19/7655

Physics in Medicine and Biology 60 (19), p. 7655-7670

Abstract

Breast-conserving surgery is a standard option for the treatment of patients with early-stage breast cancer. This form of surgery may result in incomplete excision of the tumor. Iodine-125 labeled titanium seeds are currently used in clinical practice to reduce the number of incomplete excisions. It seems likely that the number of incomplete excisions can be reduced even further if intraoperative information about the location of the radioactive seed is combined with preoperative information about the extent of the tumor. This can be combined if the location of the radioactive seed is established in a world coordinate system that can be linked to the (preoperative) image coordinate system. With this in mind, we propose a radioactive seed localization system which is composed of two static ceiling-suspended gamma camera heads and two parallel-hole collimators. Physical experiments and computer simulations which mimic realistic clinical situations were performed to estimate the localization accuracy (defined as trueness and precision) of the proposed system with respect to collimator-source distance (ranging between 50 cm and 100 cm) and imaging time (ranging between 1 s and 10 s). The goal of the study was to determine whether or not a trueness of 5 mm can be achieved if a collimator-source distance of 50 cm and imaging time of 5 s are used (these specifications were defined by a group of dedicated breast cancer surgeons). The results from the experiments indicate that the location of the radioactive seed can be established with an accuracy of 1.6 mm ┬▒ 0.6 mm if a collimator-source distance of 50 cm and imaging time of 5 s are used (these experiments were performed with a 4.5 cm thick block phantom). Furthermore, the results from the simulations indicate that a trueness of 3.2 mm or less can be achieved if a collimator-source distance of 50 cm and imaging time of 5 s are used (this trueness was achieved for all 14 breast phantoms which were used in this study). Based on these results we conclude that the proposed system can be a valuable tool for (real-time) intraoperative breast cancer localization.